The American Institute of Architects and its Leadership

In 1857, the American Institute of Architects was founded in New York by almost 13 architects who had a vision of promoting applied perfection and make architecture a career to desire and a dream. During that time the president of the institute was Richard Upjohn. American Institute of Architects has its headquarters at New York Avenue and also has a central point in Washington D.C.

Members of the institution are divided into five categories namely;

 

  1. Architect members who have licenses to practice architecture in the USA.

 

  1. Associate members who are specially licensed but are dong contracts under the strict supervision of an American Architect in a specialized or technical level and have degrees in architecture they could be interns.

 

  1. International Associate members that have architecture license that is from a licensing authority outside the country.

 

  1. Emeritus member has been an AIA member for more than 15 years and are 65 years of age and can no longer work as an architect due to age.

 

  1. Allied members are the ones that their professions are related to the building and design industry. They can include engineers, planners, interior designers, manufacturers and research companies.

 

People who have made enormous contributions toward the goals of the AIA are usually awarded a prestigious honor called the Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. The membership only goes to the members who are of national significance.

Robert Ivy is the CEO if the institute and his wisdom have elevated him to the position. He can talk about a wide range of factors that affect the architects, but he only stresses that the members need to be innovative and share ideas with software programmers.

Ivy believes that architecture affects different areas in the world and he knows that the field can provide solutions in times of disaster and also improve health by organizing household well.

Regarding architecture providing an excellent solution to public health, Robert Ivy says that first, it was because of this field that draining of swamps became possible in the past. The famous Central Park had a motive of removing lousy housing in New York, and it was not primarily a recreational area. He goes on to say that if architecture is not adequately exploited, non-communicable diseases will thrive in the population. Conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disorders can arise if people do not make buildings with staircases. His intelligence is high in maters architecture, and he is proud of how America is ahead in the field.